In 2020, even the hand sanitizer is potentially suspect. Retailers, distributors and corporate purchasers are now grappling with the added problem of clearing their shelves of it and stopping employees from using the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recalled product.

Earlier this year, to combat the novel coronavirus, the FDA issued temporary guidance to streamline regulatory processes for manufacturing alcohol-based hand sanitizer (typically ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) to get product quickly to market. Many manufacturers (generally foreign manufacturers), however, then distributed toxic or defective product to U.S.-based distributors. As such, the FDA issued a recall for certain hand sanitizer products beginning in June 2020. Over the following months, it has expanded this recall, citing risks that some products pose a risk of poisoning users with methanol and wood alcohol or leaving customers exposed to COVID-19 as a result of either adulteration or ineffective ingredients.. The FDA has advised importers, consignees, distributors, retailers and others not to distribute or sell certain hand sanitizers, even if the manufacturer of the product has not recalled it, due to the dangers of methanol contamination, including death.


Continue Reading Sanitizing Hand Sanitizer — Managing FDA-Recalled Hand Sanitizer

On November 15, EPA posted its pre-publication version of the Final Rule re-classifying aerosol cans as “universal waste” under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which finalizes EPA’s March 16, 2018 proposal (83 Fed. Reg. 11,654).  As discussed in our prior blog post regarding the proposal, many aerosol cans have historically been classified as hazardous waste because of their ignitability, and thus often are subject to stringent regulations related to handling, transportation, and disposal.

Universal waste is a sub-category of RCRA regulated hazardous waste that allows certain widely generated products, such as batteries, certain pesticides, and lamps, to qualify for less stringent regulation than the traditional hazardous waste regime.  The Final Rule is intended by EPA to ease regulatory burdens on retail stores and others that discard hazardous waste aerosol cans by providing an optional pathway for streamlined waste management treatment; promote the collection and recycling of these cans; and encourage the development of municipal and commercial programs to reduce the quantity of aerosol cans going to municipal solid waste landfills or combustors. 
Continue Reading EPA Finalizes Rule Classifying Aerosol Cans as Universal Waste